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Lauren Socha will not appear in the fourth series of Misfits.

A Channel 4 spokesperson confirmed to Digital Spy that the 21-year-old actress will not reprise her role as Kelly in the E4 drama… Clerkenwell Films and Lauren Socha agreed some time ago that along with other cast members, including Iwan Rheon and Antonia Thomas, she would not be returning for the fourth series of Misfits, which is currently in production. Channel 4 supports both parties’ decisions.”

Misfits will return to E4 in late 2012.

UGH.

We need to have a frank discussion about series 3 of Misfits.  I really enjoyed most of the season, but have a few ‘issues’ that need talking about.  There are a lot of spoilers in here so don’t be crying if I ruin something for you.

  • The thing I originally loved about the show: the powers each of the main cast received were all based on parts of their personalities. I don’t particularly like the idea of them choosing new powers based on need or whatever.  I liked how they had to deal with their given powers, but of things that could be worse this is low on the spectrum and I love Kelly saying, “I’m a fucking rocket scientist” so this gets a pass.
  • I just didn’t like the Curtis as Melissa storyline and maybe that because I don’t like Curtis.  The constant masturbating and getting caught by Alicia and then mocked for being bad at it was a nice call back to the first season. I almost wanted him to stay stuck as Melissa and see where that storyline went.
  • I was upset like most people that Nathan left the show and was replaced by Rudy, but I love Rudy. His character and power reflect back to my first point about the powers being a reflection of their real personality and his humor is definitely something the show needs, much like Nathan’s was too.
  • Rudy getting them in trouble and sending everyone back to community service was a good way to keep the group together, because would these people really be friends without it?  I doubt it.
  • The comic book fan, Peter, episode was really the only episode that featured Alicia, but was really a Simon centered episode.  Alicia had little storyline this season and I didn’t really like that. I did like seeing Simon learning to be Super Hoodie, though. 
  • The Nazi episode was crazy, but began the string of Kelly centered episodes and really aren’t we all here for Kelly?  Her first kiss with Seth happened during this episode as well. I like the introduction of Seth as a featured character this season (I want to be his boyfriend).
  • The body swapping episode was Lauren Socha’s (Kelly) high point as an actress on this series.  This episode also reflected back on season one with the killing of the probation officer, Shaun, who I was kind of getting attached to.
  • The super STD episode delivered some real funny lines from Rudy, but was overall just ok an episode. Seth also found the resurrection power and gave that to Curtis removing the power to turn into a female thus eliminating the fact that he was pregnant with his own baby. Which really? That was just too much.
  • I enjoyed the zombie episode the best this season.  Seth had Curtis resurrect his dead girlfriend.  My favorite part was the zombie cat, a nice nod to Pet Semetary I think.  Seth’s girlfriend started feeding on people and an iguana.  Zombie cheerleaders and the death of another probation worker. Seth and Kelly admit their love for each other, awww.
  • In the finale, a medium brings back three ghosts from the Misfits past.  Each of the three ghosts came back to complete some unfinished business. Sally came back to (she thought) avenge Tony’s death.  She also tried to seduce Simon and videotaped them kissing which she sent to Alicia.  Sally then tries to kill Alicia thinking this is what she was meant to come back and do in revenge for her death.  Tony, the first probation worker, comes back as well and intervenes on the roof telling Sally that they killed him in self-defense, they kiss, and disappear. The leader of the Virtue Group also returns thinking she needed to get drunk, swear, and have sex so she can move on, but after completing all these things she is still trapped on Earth.  Rudy attempts to comfort her and he unwittingly puts the idea of vengeance into her head.  She takes a box cutter and kills Alicia who dies in Simon’s arms. OK, so now that Alicia is dead Simon decides the only way to be with her is to go back in time and here is where the Super Hoodie storyline really begins. Simon&Alicia4Eva.
  • Seth gives Simon a one way time traveling power and thus begins what will likely be an endless cycle of making Alicia fall in love with him and then her dying.  This seems like a terrible way to continue living no?  Knowing that Alicia dies every time?  This episode also marked the end of Alicia and Simon’s characters on the show.  So, we’re left with Kelly, Curtis, Seth, and the two Rudys. 
  • The series was renewed for a fourth series.
  • I am VERY concerned about the possible, very likely, American remake of Misfits by Josh Schwartz.

Skins trailer for season six! There were some issues with the last season but the long break (combined with a fairly subpar season of Misfits and the depressing lack of Inbetweeners) really made this cast grow on me. The trailer is standard Skins: quick cuts of teenagers fighting, partying, crying, dancing, and smashing things ultimately leading to some disaster — all set to some hip indie song I’ve never heard of. It makes me feel very old, actually. But! The internets are already debating which character (if any) is going to die so, Skins death pool 2k12? Let’s get our bets in by January 23.

Rhetorical Question: Kelly is the best, right?

It’s kind of unfair the first (as far as I know) great TV show about millenials and twenties malaise was made by someone so successful. Apart from being fired at 18 from Nickelodeon UK for being too sarcastic to the kids, Simon Amstell’s kind of had a dream career. He co-hosted the music interview show Popworld for five years, then became the second host of the pop music pop quiz show Never Mind the Buzzcocks for four series, before abruptly announcing his departure.
And after a few years, now there’s Grandma’s House. Co-created and co-written and starring Simon as Simon, who quits his pop music pop quiz show to take some time to suss out his purpose in life in the first episode. The episodes take place when Simon comes home to visit, helpless to fight his mother’s approaching wedding to her oafish (and homicidal) fiancé Clive, his aunt Liz’s continued problems finding schools willing to teach her horny son Adam, and his sweet if clueless grandparents.
The first couple of episodes are funny, but there’s some human element missing. This changes with the third episode, which is magic. Simon’s long-standing crush, the soft-spoken serious actor Ben Whishaw Theodore (everyone’s other favorite Simon, Iwan Rheon) stops by and, because this is television, hijinks ensue. Painful, painful hijinks, starting with Simon admitting he recently tried to hit on Ben by “coming up behind him and shouting his full name” in a fit of nervousness, and when they get reacquainted in the episode’s last third, Simon manages to do it again, his family watching on, half-amused and half-cringing.
It’s the first episode to do what the rest manage so well: it balances the laughs with some genuine, emotional moments. As funny as it is to see Simon stand at the bathroom mirror, insisting, “You’re a person who can exist in real life,” it’s depressingly relatable, and such a deft mix of humorous-and-heartbreaking you’re not sure if you should be laughing at him because it is just as much laughing at yourself. The basic conversation practice he follow-through with to his reflection (“Hey. How are you. How funny to see you here.”) only makes it worse. 
As the series continues, Simon only becomes more of the model twenty-something, jobless and working on his “writing” (a play ostensibly about eggs but actually about his family, because even the meta is meta), finding various self-actualizing courses and trying to convince his family he’s not in a funk. At first, it’s easy to see the family through Simon’s eyes, making him the objective observer to their craziness. By the end of the show, it’s impossible to ignore how he is just as unbalanced as the rest of them, and possibly more narcissistic. The show’s humor gets so sharp it stings, and every episode builds on the one prior as Simon just wants some happiness in his life, or Adam needs to find another school willing to put up with him, or Tanya gets closer to marrying Clive and living the high life. All these imperfect people aggravating each other can be nerve-wracking to watch, but it’s kind of the perfect family sitcom in ways that Everybody Loves Raymond or Modern Family could never get right.
It seemed at first like these six episodes were all that would ever come of the show, but in January BBC2 commissioned a second series to air sometime in 2012, almost two years after the airing of the first. (Ugh, British television, so uncool of you.) And as much as that sucks, there’s always clips of Simon shouting "BEN THEODORE? WELCOME TO MY GRANDMA’S HOUSE" around the internet, and it makes the wait that much more bearable.
words by alex, who blogs over at alexandra-ewing.

It’s kind of unfair the first (as far as I know) great TV show about millenials and twenties malaise was made by someone so successful. Apart from being fired at 18 from Nickelodeon UK for being too sarcastic to the kids, Simon Amstell’s kind of had a dream career. He co-hosted the music interview show Popworld for five years, then became the second host of the pop music pop quiz show Never Mind the Buzzcocks for four series, before abruptly announcing his departure.

And after a few years, now there’s Grandma’s House. Co-created and co-written and starring Simon as Simon, who quits his pop music pop quiz show to take some time to suss out his purpose in life in the first episode. The episodes take place when Simon comes home to visit, helpless to fight his mother’s approaching wedding to her oafish (and homicidal) fiancé Clive, his aunt Liz’s continued problems finding schools willing to teach her horny son Adam, and his sweet if clueless grandparents.

The first couple of episodes are funny, but there’s some human element missing. This changes with the third episode, which is magic. Simon’s long-standing crush, the soft-spoken serious actor Ben Whishaw Theodore (everyone’s other favorite Simon, Iwan Rheon) stops by and, because this is television, hijinks ensue. Painful, painful hijinks, starting with Simon admitting he recently tried to hit on Ben by “coming up behind him and shouting his full name” in a fit of nervousness, and when they get reacquainted in the episode’s last third, Simon manages to do it again, his family watching on, half-amused and half-cringing.

It’s the first episode to do what the rest manage so well: it balances the laughs with some genuine, emotional moments. As funny as it is to see Simon stand at the bathroom mirror, insisting, “You’re a person who can exist in real life,” it’s depressingly relatable, and such a deft mix of humorous-and-heartbreaking you’re not sure if you should be laughing at him because it is just as much laughing at yourself. The basic conversation practice he follow-through with to his reflection (“Hey. How are you. How funny to see you here.”) only makes it worse. 

As the series continues, Simon only becomes more of the model twenty-something, jobless and working on his “writing” (a play ostensibly about eggs but actually about his family, because even the meta is meta), finding various self-actualizing courses and trying to convince his family he’s not in a funk. At first, it’s easy to see the family through Simon’s eyes, making him the objective observer to their craziness. By the end of the show, it’s impossible to ignore how he is just as unbalanced as the rest of them, and possibly more narcissistic. The show’s humor gets so sharp it stings, and every episode builds on the one prior as Simon just wants some happiness in his life, or Adam needs to find another school willing to put up with him, or Tanya gets closer to marrying Clive and living the high life. All these imperfect people aggravating each other can be nerve-wracking to watch, but it’s kind of the perfect family sitcom in ways that Everybody Loves Raymond or Modern Family could never get right.

It seemed at first like these six episodes were all that would ever come of the show, but in January BBC2 commissioned a second series to air sometime in 2012, almost two years after the airing of the first. (Ugh, British television, so uncool of you.) And as much as that sucks, there’s always clips of Simon shouting "BEN THEODORE? WELCOME TO MY GRANDMA’S HOUSE" around the internet, and it makes the wait that much more bearable.

words by alex, who blogs over at alexandra-ewing.

Okay, fine, I guess we can also talk about this line from the Skins series finale.

And also this very important text message:

Here are the options: We could talk about the whole Skins (UK) finale. We could talk about the entire season (and the hits and misses). We could talk about these characters (again, hit or miss) vs. previous generations. We could talk about it comparison to @MTVSKINS#SEXDRUGSANDSLEIGHBELLS (Is it still on? Is season one over? Is anyone still watching it? If a tree falls in a forest, etc.) but really, I just want to focus on this one line:

"You know, when I was six, a teacher asked me to think of something beautiful. I said 9/11."

I get it. I mean, obviously I don’t REALLY get it because haha, what? But I get the intention? Maybe? It’s trying to make Franky different by remarking on how she views things vs. how the rest of the world views things and therefore how she views herself (as “wrong” and she’s constantly abandoned and ugh, you just don’t UNDERSTAND me, MOM, we are we are the youth of the nation) and all of this shit, like in the same vein as Effy’s “Sometimes I think I was born backwards” speech. But it really just comes off as quirkangst and it’s not jarring or evocative (it’s also too unintentionally hilarious to be offensive), it’s just “Well, that’s weird, I guess.” Anyway right after she says this, she starts making out with a dude in the forest or something and then almost falls off a cliff so WHATEVER. Being a teenager is tough because you’re all crazy hormonal and everything is all acne and terrorism and cocaine and falling off cliffs. Also: remember back in the first generation when Skins had a 9/11 themed musical? “9/11, 9/11, 9/11 ACK!” - Skins.

What I’m trying to say is that I have a lot of *feelings* to work out regarding if I actually liked this season, and it mostly has to do with an internal conflict about whether or not I’m too old to be emotionally invested in the drama of fictional British teenagers who were SIX when 9/11 happened.

"All you need for a mediocre episode of a once great British television show is a gun and an androgynous girl." - Godard, on the season 5 premiere of Skins.

One Born Every Minute celebrates what it really feels like to become a parent, by taking a bustling maternity hospital and filling it with forty cameras.