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Still no premiere date for Season 2 of Gravity Falls, but we now have some promo art. 

Still no premiere date for Season 2 of Gravity Falls, but we now have some promo art

Every so often my two boys will start watching a new cartoon and as a parent who is obsessed with TV I need to keep in the loop. They lead me to watch such great shows as Gravity Falls, Regular Show, and Steven Universe. The latest show in their rotation is Nickelodeon’s Sanjay and Craig.

Produced by Pete And Pete co-creators Will McRobb and Chris Viscardi, the show tells the story of an Indian-American boy, Sanjay, and his best friend, Craig. The two go on a series of adventures, all predicated on and hindered by the fact that Craig is a snake. The Calvin And Hobbes-like dynamic makes for tons of wacky adventures: In the first episode, the two protagonists attempt to witness a butt transplant and try to find new laughs after being convinced that theirs are the worst. So, yeah, it’s pretty weird and juvenile—but in a great way.

Voiced by Maulik Pancholy (30 Rock’s Jonathan) and Chris Hardwick respectively, Sanjay and Craig are an incredibly endearing twosome. They have secret conferences inside Sanjay’s shirt and a giggly language that, while it’s clearly just meant for the two of them, is easily grasped by anyone jumping into the series. The series’ ancillary characters, like Sanjay’s doctor mom or the duo’s pageant-girl neighbor, Megan (Linda Cardellini), are also pretty great. Sanjay and Craig also have a weird neighbor, Mr. Noodman (Tony Hale), who hates snakes and wants to kill Craig, but the threat never gets so serious as to endanger either Craig or any of the show’s action. (via)

New episodes air on Saturdays and the show has already been renewed for a second season. If you’re looking for a place to start my boys told me their favorite episodes are ‘Laked Nake’ and ‘Fart Baby’. Sanjay and Craig should be in your TV viewing rotation.

It’s the first CN series from a solo female creator — which doesn’t put that network behind the rest of the world, especially. With a few rule-proving exceptions, animation was a sexually segregated industry for many decades, relegating women to the ink-and-paint department. There were noted outsiders, such as Faith Hubley and Sally Cruikshank, animating in the days of yore, but you will not exhaust your fingers and toes counting them. Things are changing, but it’s still mostly dudes running the show.

Steven (Zach Callison) is a chubby boy of indeterminate preteen age who seems to live in the custody of but also fights alongside three universe-defending superwomen, the Crystal Gems: Garnet (the British R&B singer Estelle), Amethyst (Michaela Dietz) and Pearl (Deedee Magno). Each is embedded with a magical, mystical jewel that confers distinct special powers.

Is there anything particularly female about the series? I suppose so, in the way that there’s something “female” about Tina Weymouth’s bass playing or Jane Freilicher’s still lifes, and because art reflects everything that makes the artist. There may be more salmon and violet in the palette than usual; possibly the emotional notes are more delicately and naturally struck than in, say, “Phineas and Ferb,” to hazard a couple of stereotypes. The important point is that more diversity among animators means more diverse cartoons.

And Sugar’s good at this stuff — which is all that really counts. (via)

I hope you are all watching Steven Universe.

Gravity Falls draws comparisons to Lost and The X-Files

The animated series “Gravity Falls” is an unusual toon animal. It blends broad comedy with mythology-driven storytelling that is provoking “Lost”-like online discussions of clues and cryptograms woven into each episode as part of an unfolding mystery.
The half-hour show revolves around teenage twin brother and sister Dipper (voiced by Jason Ritter) and Mabel (Kristen Schaal) who are sent to spend the summer with their cantankerous great-uncle Stan (aka “Grunkle Stan”) in the Oregon hamlet of Gravity Falls, where he runs a roadside attraction dubbed the Mystery Shack. 
The conceit is tailor-made for layering in the kind of solve-the-puzzle elements that fuel the conspiracy-theory genre pioneered by “Lost” and “The X-Files.” Putting that kind of storytelling into an animated skein was a stroke of inspiration from “Gravity Falls” creator Alex Hirsch, who was Dipper’s age when “X-Files” was at its peak. (via)

Gravity Falls draws comparisons to Lost and The X-Files

The animated series “Gravity Falls” is an unusual toon animal. It blends broad comedy with mythology-driven storytelling that is provoking “Lost”-like online discussions of clues and cryptograms woven into each episode as part of an unfolding mystery.

The half-hour show revolves around teenage twin brother and sister Dipper (voiced by Jason Ritter) and Mabel (Kristen Schaal) who are sent to spend the summer with their cantankerous great-uncle Stan (aka “Grunkle Stan”) in the Oregon hamlet of Gravity Falls, where he runs a roadside attraction dubbed the Mystery Shack. 

The conceit is tailor-made for layering in the kind of solve-the-puzzle elements that fuel the conspiracy-theory genre pioneered by “Lost” and “The X-Files.” Putting that kind of storytelling into an animated skein was a stroke of inspiration from “Gravity Falls” creator Alex Hirsch, who was Dipper’s age when “X-Files” was at its peak. (via)

“Awesome comeback, Mabel!” “Don’t treat me like a child, Xyler.” It’s up against some unimaginably stiff competition, but that might be favorite Kristen Schaal line reading ever. The fact that the patronizing complement comes from John Roberts, who voices the mother of Schaal’s other animated character, is also a great little in-joke. (via)

I know we here at TV Hangover love a well written animated program, like Bob’s Burgers, Archer, or Beavis & Butthead, but we (or at least I) would be remiss if there was not even one mention of the brilliance that is Disney Channel’s Gravity Falls.

One week from today (August 2nd) is the first season finale which leaves you plenty of time to catch up on the previous 19 episodes (I mean they’re only 20 minutes - you can finish that in one night). Maybe you are unconvinced or scared because of the Disney Channel? Take a chance because Gravity Falls is a weird place that you should totally get lost in.

Archer is one of those rare shows that’s capable of finding humor both high and low in its characters’ diverse and often self-inflicted quandaries, whether they’re dangerous missions in exotic locations, or just a bevy of HR complaints. Like anything great, Archer has its following on Tumblr, including copious gif sets from choice jokes, two different Fuck Yeah Archer blogs, and fandom crossovers like Sterling Archer Draper Price. Although show creator Adam Reed was indisposed (in his “writing cave” attempting to finished the season finale’s script) Matt Thompson, Executive Producer and collaborator with Reed on such wonderful shows as Sealab 2021 & Frisky Dingo was nice enough to answer our most pressing questions about Archer. 
How did you two start working together?Thompson: Adam and I were both working in the On-Air Promotions department at Cartoon Network (1994???). It was a really great place to work too. It still had that small, us against them feel as the network had not been around that long. At that time it was mostly a place to catch old Hanna Barbera cartoons as Adult Swim did not exist yet. Our boss, a really great guy named Stephen Croncota, decided to pair us together to make some small interstitial shows to wrap around things like the Smurfs. We came up with a talking hand show where my hand was a no nonsense cowboy and Adam’s hand was my wacky sidekick. I use to have tons of tape on this, but I can no longer find it. I did find one thing online, a promo we did for an upcoming show of ours.  It starts at the one minute mark.


A running theme in your shows has been high-flying settings (dangerous missions, world domination) mixed with the incredibly mundane (pay raises, political campaigns). What things have informed your choice to juxtapose those situations?The high-flying setting stuff comes from Adam’s love of Ian Fleming’s James Bond character. Not the one we have today (which is great too), but the original novel version of the character where he is much darker, much more of a misogynist. And Adam likes to have fun with that.  Additionally Adam is incredibly well traveled having spent recent time in the Middle East and Vietnam. And he speaks fluent Spanish and French.  

The mundane thing comes from the two of us running a small business as we have owned the company that makes all of our shows since 1999. We employ a staff and deal with standard small business stuff everyday: taxes, health insurance, paper jams, office colds. No matter what business you work in, I think people can all identify with someone at the office throwing a fit because we are out of staples.  

And we have always had fun putting those two things together - life and death danger goes to the HR department.


You mentioned in a previous interview that the characters were drawn from real people in Atlanta. Was that the process used Frisky Dingo? Why did you choose to create the characters that way?
We do create characters from real people in Atlanta… mostly. For example Cyril Figgis happens to run a series of very high end restarants in Atlanta. Pam Poovey has an antiques shop in a part of town  called the highlands. Ray Gillette is actually Lucky Yates who voices Dr. Krieger. Then our staff fills in a lot of the other characters. This year our lead character designer, Chi, actually appears in a couple of episodes as herself. 

It was slightly different on Frisky. Frisky was a little simpler. But the basics of the process are the same.  

We choose to create the characters this way because we were looking for something that a large staff could draw quickly that we would not have to worry as much about everyone’s different drawing styles. But now that our illustration staff has been together so long, they are making up a lot of characters out of thin air. Which is nice.


Walk us through the writing process of an episode of Archer.Adam sits down at his computer and bangs them out. He does a lot of this from home, where things are more quiet. People always ask me about how wacky our writers room meetings are. And then everyone is shocked to find out this is just one guy typing away.

Even if the scripts were not great (which they always are), he should be commended for the amount of actual words he writes in a year. 


Which character do you have the most fun writing for?I would think that Adam would say Pam. She is unfiltered, but yet she seems kind. I think she gets the best lines. 


Having the show set in an indeterminate time period allows you to draw on a lot of imagery—and technology—from diverse points in history. Has there ever been something you felt was too out of place?Hmmm…  not sure.  I know we had a big talk about cell phones early on.  Because we definitely wanted them and wanted them to exist.  At the same time, we did not want phone cords to exist.  But that was strictly out of them being a pain in the ass to deal with animation wise.   I think I am going to turn this over to our Art Director, Neal Holman, for better insight. 

Holman: In 203, Movie Star — the episode where the actress/assassin Rhona Thorne was “Amazing!” —- there is a shot of Cheryl and Pam watching an internet broadcast on their computers.   It didn’t stick out at the time, but in hindsight, that crossed over a line into familiar modernity that we try to avoid.  Most of the ISIS computers have the old MS DOS interface.  Malory’s computer and those in Signal Intelligence are the only machines that are supposed to have that level of technology (internet, satellite, etc.


You already got your wish in working with David Cross for the ‘Heart of Archness’ trilogy. Is there anyone else you’d like to have on the show?This season we are going to have Timothy Olyphant playing Archer’s best friend. And he was just great at the whole thing. Charming, funny, and attractive - ugh. Also, Anthony Bourdain plays a bastard celebrity chef in something this season. Adam wrote the part specifically for him as we think he is one of the coolest people on the planet. And for the two part season finale, we have a big secret casting coming. But I am going to hold on to that for a while.
There are a lot of people that I think are really great that we would love to do something with. But if I had to pick just one, I think it would be Daniel Craig. But I would want him in a role as far away from his James Bond character as possible. Something that would allow him and us to make fun of the spy stuff together. 


One of the coolest things about the show is its spectrum of humor, which can transition immediately from a Melville reference to dick jokes. How do you balance the two and do you see much of a difference between them?It is a really tricky balance and honestly  I do not know how Adam does it. Let me give you an example. Myself and producer Casey Willis avidly read almost every spec script we get. We do this because we are desperate to not have Adam writing so much as his fingers may literally fall off. Anyway, almost every time we read these scripts, there is something too gross in there: “jokes” about menstruation or jacking off monkeys… weird, un-funny shit. The writers are trying too hard to push the boundaries and would be better off just being clever. 

I do not know how Adam can write a fart joke and it comes out like it does not stink. But he does it. I think he is able to do this because he is a very bright guy that has no desire to please anyone but himself.  He does not hang out in LA; we all live and work in Atlanta. He does not have a Mercedes; he drives a russian made motorcycle with a sidecar (Ural). And he will frequently hand me a great book, urging me to read it. But then warn me that he just farted on it.


There are a lot of oddball references throughout the show, but one of the most unexpected was the ‘Archers of Loaf-cross’ (and on that note, Woodhouse’s apparent taste for Charles Mingus). What music are you into?Adam knew Archers of Loaf while he was in college at UNC Chapel Hill. Adam listens to a lot of classic stuff like Mingus and Sarah Vaughan. But really his tastes are all over. A LONG TIME ago we lived together and I remember a lot of G Love and Special Sauce mixed with the Rebirth Brass Band. But the thing I remember most about his music tastes are the things he hates: Pink Floyd and the The Doors come to mind.

I end up listening to a lot of sports talk radio during football season. But when that is all over, I return to Black Keys, Radiohead, and lately a lot of Alabama Shakes.


Will learning the identity of his biological father make Archer any kinder?No.


Have we seen the last of Baboo?Baboo will be back.  But there is now a new animal in the mix this season that Archer falls in love with. It comes in an episode late in the year. Basically it is Archer hanging out with Cujo.  

Plus have you seen this shirt we had Pam wear? We had an in-house design contest where the studio voted on which shirt design most people wanted for our Production Crew shirts.  This shirt was one of the runners up.  When we used it in a Pam tweet the other day, the internet was asking why it is not for sale on FX’s website.  We are asking them this as well.





Can you give us any details about the Archer/Bob’s Burgers crossover? How did you convince the networks it was a good idea?It was not the networks as much as convincing Loren Bouchard that we meant no harm to his Bob’s universe. Luckily he was super cool about the whole thing. And I can not wait for people to see it.  It will look like their restaurant and their characters, but we have “Archer-ized” them to exist in our world. 


And the requisite TV Hangover question: What’s your alcohol of choice and best hangover remedy? Bourbon. Always bourbon. For both Adam and myself. But I try my best to avoid it as I like staying married. But we just got some for the crew last week. If you have not heard of B&E Bourbon, google it immediately. They are made by a distillery in California named St. George Spirits. It is amazing.

Best hangover remedy: drink more bourbon. One of my favorite Archer lines: “If I stop drinking all at once, I’m afraid the cumulative hangover will kill me.”


Archer returns for a fourth season tonight at 10pm on FX.

Archer is one of those rare shows that’s capable of finding humor both high and low in its characters’ diverse and often self-inflicted quandaries, whether they’re dangerous missions in exotic locations, or just a bevy of HR complaints. Like anything great, Archer has its following on Tumblr, including copious gif sets from choice jokes, two different Fuck Yeah Archer blogs, and fandom crossovers like Sterling Archer Draper Price. Although show creator Adam Reed was indisposed (in his “writing cave” attempting to finished the season finale’s script) Matt Thompson, Executive Producer and collaborator with Reed on such wonderful shows as Sealab 2021 & Frisky Dingo was nice enough to answer our most pressing questions about Archer

How did you two start working together?
Thompson: Adam and I were both working in the On-Air Promotions department at Cartoon Network (1994???). It was a really great place to work too. It still had that small, us against them feel as the network had not been around that long. At that time it was mostly a place to catch old Hanna Barbera cartoons as Adult Swim did not exist yet. Our boss, a really great guy named Stephen Croncota, decided to pair us together to make some small interstitial shows to wrap around things like the Smurfs. We came up with a talking hand show where my hand was a no nonsense cowboy and Adam’s hand was my wacky sidekick. I use to have tons of tape on this, but I can no longer find it. I did find one thing online, a promo we did for an upcoming show of ours.  It starts at the one minute mark.


A running theme in your shows has been high-flying settings (dangerous missions, world domination) mixed with the incredibly mundane (pay raises, political campaigns). What things have informed your choice to juxtapose those situations?
The high-flying setting stuff comes from Adam’s love of Ian Fleming’s James Bond character. Not the one we have today (which is great too), but the original novel version of the character where he is much darker, much more of a misogynist. And Adam likes to have fun with that.  Additionally Adam is incredibly well traveled having spent recent time in the Middle East and Vietnam. And he speaks fluent Spanish and French.  

The mundane thing comes from the two of us running a small business as we have owned the company that makes all of our shows since 1999. We employ a staff and deal with standard small business stuff everyday: taxes, health insurance, paper jams, office colds. No matter what business you work in, I think people can all identify with someone at the office throwing a fit because we are out of staples.  

And we have always had fun putting those two things together - life and death danger goes to the HR department.


You mentioned in a previous interview that the characters were drawn from real people in Atlanta. Was that the process used Frisky Dingo? Why did you choose to create the characters that way?
We do create characters from real people in Atlanta… mostly. For example Cyril Figgis happens to run a series of very high end restarants in Atlanta. Pam Poovey has an antiques shop in a part of town  called the highlands. Ray Gillette is actually Lucky Yates who voices Dr. Krieger. Then our staff fills in a lot of the other characters. This year our lead character designer, Chi, actually appears in a couple of episodes as herself. 

It was slightly different on Frisky. Frisky was a little simpler. But the basics of the process are the same.  

We choose to create the characters this way because we were looking for something that a large staff could draw quickly that we would not have to worry as much about everyone’s different drawing styles. But now that our illustration staff has been together so long, they are making up a lot of characters out of thin air. Which is nice.


Walk us through the writing process of an episode of Archer.
Adam sits down at his computer and bangs them out. He does a lot of this from home, where things are more quiet. People always ask me about how wacky our writers room meetings are. And then everyone is shocked to find out this is just one guy typing away.

Even if the scripts were not great (which they always are), he should be commended for the amount of actual words he writes in a year. 


Which character do you have the most fun writing for?
I would think that Adam would say Pam. She is unfiltered, but yet she seems kind. I think she gets the best lines. 


Having the show set in an indeterminate time period allows you to draw on a lot of imagery—and technology—from diverse points in history. Has there ever been something you felt was too out of place?
Hmmm…  not sure.  I know we had a big talk about cell phones early on.  Because we definitely wanted them and wanted them to exist.  At the same time, we did not want phone cords to exist.  But that was strictly out of them being a pain in the ass to deal with animation wise.   I think I am going to turn this over to our Art Director, Neal Holman, for better insight. 

Holman: In 203, Movie Star — the episode where the actress/assassin Rhona Thorne was “Amazing!” —- there is a shot of Cheryl and Pam watching an internet broadcast on their computers.   It didn’t stick out at the time, but in hindsight, that crossed over a line into familiar modernity that we try to avoid.  Most of the ISIS computers have the old MS DOS interface.  Malory’s computer and those in Signal Intelligence are the only machines that are supposed to have that level of technology (internet, satellite, etc.


You already got your wish in working with David Cross for the ‘Heart of Archness’ trilogy. Is there anyone else you’d like to have on the show?
This season we are going to have Timothy Olyphant playing Archer’s best friend. And he was just great at the whole thing. Charming, funny, and attractive - ugh. Also, Anthony Bourdain plays a bastard celebrity chef in something this season. Adam wrote the part specifically for him as we think he is one of the coolest people on the planet. And for the two part season finale, we have a big secret casting coming. But I am going to hold on to that for a while.

There are a lot of people that I think are really great that we would love to do something with. But if I had to pick just one, I think it would be Daniel Craig. But I would want him in a role as far away from his James Bond character as possible. Something that would allow him and us to make fun of the spy stuff together. 


One of the coolest things about the show is its spectrum of humor, which can transition immediately from a Melville reference to dick jokes. How do you balance the two and do you see much of a difference between them?
It is a really tricky balance and honestly  I do not know how Adam does it. Let me give you an example. Myself and producer Casey Willis avidly read almost every spec script we get. We do this because we are desperate to not have Adam writing so much as his fingers may literally fall off. Anyway, almost every time we read these scripts, there is something too gross in there: “jokes” about menstruation or jacking off monkeys… weird, un-funny shit. The writers are trying too hard to push the boundaries and would be better off just being clever. 

I do not know how Adam can write a fart joke and it comes out like it does not stink. But he does it. I think he is able to do this because he is a very bright guy that has no desire to please anyone but himself.  He does not hang out in LA; we all live and work in Atlanta. He does not have a Mercedes; he drives a russian made motorcycle with a sidecar (Ural). And he will frequently hand me a great book, urging me to read it. But then warn me that he just farted on it.


There are a lot of oddball references throughout the show, but one of the most unexpected was the ‘Archers of Loaf-cross’ (and on that note, Woodhouse’s apparent taste for Charles Mingus). What music are you into?
Adam knew Archers of Loaf while he was in college at UNC Chapel Hill. Adam listens to a lot of classic stuff like Mingus and Sarah Vaughan. But really his tastes are all over. A LONG TIME ago we lived together and I remember a lot of G Love and Special Sauce mixed with the Rebirth Brass Band. But the thing I remember most about his music tastes are the things he hates: Pink Floyd and the The Doors come to mind.

I end up listening to a lot of sports talk radio during football season. But when that is all over, I return to Black Keys, Radiohead, and lately a lot of Alabama Shakes.


Will learning the identity of his biological father make Archer any kinder?
No.


Have we seen the last of Baboo?
Baboo will be back.  But there is now a new animal in the mix this season that Archer falls in love with. It comes in an episode late in the year. Basically it is Archer hanging out with Cujo.  

Plus have you seen this shirt we had Pam wear? We had an in-house design contest where the studio voted on which shirt design most people wanted for our Production Crew shirts.  This shirt was one of the runners up.  When we used it in a Pam tweet the other day, the internet was asking why it is not for sale on FX’s website.  We are asking them this as well.
image
Can you give us any details about the Archer/Bob’s Burgers crossover? How did you convince the networks it was a good idea?
It was not the networks as much as convincing Loren Bouchard that we meant no harm to his Bob’s universe. Luckily he was super cool about the whole thing. And I can not wait for people to see it.  It will look like their restaurant and their characters, but we have “Archer-ized” them to exist in our world. 


And the requisite TV Hangover question: What’s your alcohol of choice and best hangover remedy? 
Bourbon. Always bourbon. For both Adam and myself. But I try my best to avoid it as I like staying married. But we just got some for the crew last week. If you have not heard of B&E Bourbon, google it immediately. They are made by a distillery in California named St. George Spirits. It is amazing.

Best hangover remedy: drink more bourbon. One of my favorite Archer lines: “If I stop drinking all at once, I’m afraid the cumulative hangover will kill me.”


Archer returns for a fourth season tonight at 10pm on FX.

Last night’s Thanksgiving episode of Bob’s Burgers was great enough, but this morning we get The National’s cover of Linda’s song? This show is perfect.

It’s no secret that Bob’s Burgers is a favorite among the TV Hangover crew and Tumblr in general. It makes sense because not only is the show consistently and uproariously funny, but it’s also so perfectly strange. The characters are comfortably uncomfortable with themselves and it’s one of the few shows on television to reallynail down that awkward feeling of adolescence and portray it with a mixture of laughs and heart. Of course the show is popular on Tumblr, a site where most users embrace their weirdness instead of hiding behind it. This character trait is one that the Belcher children seem to share and the Belcher parents encourage. Scroll through your dashboard and you’re bound to find someone excited about their upcoming Belcher Halloween costume; post a picture of Tina and within minutes you’ll have a ton of “GPOY” reblogs. In addition to the handful of fanmade Bob’s Burgers blogs, the writers themselves created Behind Bob’s Burgers. It’s a refreshing blog, one that isn’t run by an out-of-touch network or a bored intern but rather run by the writers themselves who post exclusive sneak peeks, fan art, give away t-shirts, and (most importantly) engage with the community. They were also kind enough to answer a few of our ridiculous questions. 

Much of the cast are accomplished comedians. Is it intimidating to write for them, and how many of their lines are ad-libbed?
JON SCHREODER: Yes, very. But they are as giving as they are hilarious, so it’s not as scary as you’d think. They improvise a lot of their lines, and we keep just about all of the network-friendly ones.

 

How are you able to balance the absurdity of the comedy with how genuinely charming the relationship within the Belcher family is?
MIKE BENNER: There is a warm, beating, gooey heart at the center of our show. We go to some unsavory places and meet unseemly characters, but there’s always affection for them. The show is really just about a struggling, loving, supportive family that is really amused by one another. But also transvestite prostitutes.
JON SCHROEDER: Luckily, those things seem to go hand-in-hand, which is a credit to Loren Bouchard for creating such wonderfully flawed yet beautiful characters.

 

How much of Walter & Perry from Home Movies carried over into the creation of Ollie & Andy Pesto? What’s so successful about that dynamic?
JON SCHROEDER: You’re living in the past, man. Get with the times.

 

Have any of you worked in the food industry? Tell us a story about something odd/awful that happened during that job.
WENDY MOLYNEUX: I used to work at The Squat & Gobble, which is a breakfast place in the Upper Haight in San Francisco. One day a homeless woman came in seeming pretty agitated and started picking off people’s plates pretty aggressively. I told her I’d make her a big box of food if she’d wait outside. Feeling pretty full of myself about my altruism, a few minutes later I took her a styrofoam container filled with home fries, etc. She took it, looked me square in the eye and said, “Thank you. When you get off work today, I’m gonna come back here and stab you in the heart.”
KIT BOSS: Before becoming a TV writer, I worked in a slaughterhouse. However, nothing odd or awful ever happened in my six years there. It was a beautiful, ennobling experience, and I miss it every day.
MIKE BENNER: I’ve never worked in a restaurant, but I did grow up working in my family’s hardware store for most of my childhood. One night, my brother was ringing up an old lady at the register when I noticed a well-dressed but not fully with it old man smoking a cigarette in the store. Then I noticed turds rolling out of his pant leg. He was smoking, pooping, and standing in the plumbing aisle, muttering to himself. I didn’t know what to do, other than to ask him to finish his cigarette outside, and he shuffled out the front door. As I was cleaning up the poop, the old lady from earlier asked what I did with her husband was, as if I murdered him. I told her I asked him to finish his smoke outside, and she yelled at me that he was a veteran and should be allowed to smoke wherever he wants. I was already cleaning up her husband’s poop, so I felt maybe she could have been a bit nicer. Is that awful enough?
JON SCHROEDER: Do the words “employee of the month, May of ‘92 at the San Francisco Fisherman’s Wharf TGI Fridays” mean anything to you?

 

Has anyone actually attempted to make the Meatsiah? 
JON SCHROEDER: Yeah, John Madden. It’s replaced his Turducken.

 

Weirdest thing in your writers room?
MIKE BENNER: A Hamburglar cookie jar that contains the soul of writer Scott Jacobson. If the cookie jar breaks, he dies.
JON SCHROEDER: Two competing medical-type drawings of how farts are made, on a white board that is supposed to be used for story breaking.
KIT BOSS: We have several splinters of the True Cross, an early landscape painting by Adolph Hitler, a life preserver from the S.S. Andrea Doria, and a Hamburglar cookie jar. But the most unusual thing is probably an early draft of a “Bob’s Burgers” Season 1 script with no fart jokes.

 

Have you ever worried that there are a finite number of burger puns?
JON SCHROEDER: No Whey (served on a bun with no whey)

 

What shows did you grow up watching?
JON SCHROEDER: Cheers, Family Ties, Miami Vice, Alf, Get a Life, Bakersfield PD.
MIKE BENNER: Cheers, The Simpsons, Get A Life, Night Court, Seinfeld, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, Saturday Night Live… I had a habit of faking sick at least one day a week to stay home and watch reruns of Hogan’s Heroes, Abbot & Costello, and perhaps most embarrassingly, Mama’s Family.

 

Tumblr is full of Bob’s Burgers related blogs — Texts From Bob’s Burgers, Ask Tina Belcher, Of House Belcher, etc. — and the show has a huge fanbase on the site. Were you conscious of this before you decided create a Tumblr? Do you think that Tumblr (and other social media sites) has had a big impact in bringing attention to the show?
MIKE BENNER: Tumblr is great because it seems like it sits at the crossroads of superfandom and creativity. It’s not enough for people on Tumblr to be fans of something, they have to create stuff about it, which is great. Ask Tina Belcher is funny and infinitely flattering and makes us feel nice in our inside parts. Natasha Allegri is a super talented artist on Adventure Time who’s really big on Tumblr, and she does a bunch of great Bob’s Burgers fan art that we enjoy. We love it all and we love the people that create it, which is why we started a Tumblr that exists pretty much solely to give t-shirts to those people.

 
What is your dream TV crossover episode? We’ve all voted Bob’s Burgers meets SVU.
MIKE BENNER: SVU is a show about sex crimes against children so I don’t even want to think about how it relates to Bob’s Burgers, you sickos.


Who is your dream guest celebrity voice to get on the show?
MIKE BENNER: Um, Kevin Kline, much? What more do we need?
JON SCHROEDER: Samuel Jackson, Sir Ian McKellan, Carol Burnett.

 

What was it like when you got the call (or email? telegram? whatever) to join the staff of Bob’s Burgers?
JON SCHROEDER: An answer to prayer. I really, really wanted this job. I was vacationing in Mexico, which I couldn’t afford when I got the good news. Lots of cerveza followed.
MIKE BENNER: That was the day I finally stopped cutting. Thanks, Loren and Jim.

 

While all of the characters have dedicated fanbases, it seems that Tina Belcher became the breakout — especially on the internet. Why do you think it is that viewers latched on to her the most?
JON SCHROEDER: I think she’s just very relatable. She is honest, wears her heart on her sleeve, delightfully nerdy and destined for greatness.
MIKE BENNER: Tina is the embodiment of everyone’s awkward teenage years. But unlike teenage me, teenage you, and teenage everyone else, she is almost pretty much okay with who she is as a person. She’s not ashamed of being really into horses and writing erotic fan fiction. I wish I was like Tina when I was a teenager. I wish I was like her as an adult.

 

Who decides the name of the store to the left of Bob’s Burgers for every title sequence?
JON SCHREODER: David Schwimmer. Loren Bouchard lost some weird parlour bet to him.
KIT BOSS: Former U.S. Secretary of Commerce Barbara Hackman Franklin.
MIKE BENNER: All the storefronts so far have been failed business that Loren Bouchard has actually owned, operated, and subsequently closed.

 

What’s your alcohol of choice and best hangover remedy? 
JON SCHROEDER: Beer, and Beer with an Advil floater.
MIKE BENNER: Any bourbon drink that grandmas like: Manhattan, Old Fashioned, Whiskey Ginger, whatever. As for hangover remedies, I find going for a nice long drive before I go to bed helps me avoid hangovers in the morning. 

Bob’s Burgers airs Sundays at 8:30 on Fox. Be sure to check out the trailer for their upcoming Halloween episode (which we’re already predicting will go down in history as one of our favorite holiday episodes). You can follow the writers on both Tumblr and Twitter

Bob’s Burgers remains one of the funniest shows on television. I can’t decide which one of Tina’s fan fiction collection is my favorite but I’m leaning toward Sexy 60 Minutes.

Archer is back tonight and Burt Reynolds guest stars and nothing else matters.