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We at TV Hangover love a Mad Men theory & here’s a great one from Pajiba:

I’ve watched the odd 9-second scene near the end of the episode with Bonnie and Megan on a plane that ends with the stewardess closing the curtain about 14 times now. I can only draw one conclusion from it, and it’s the most obvious one: That it was the concluding part of Bonnie and Megan’s performance in Mad Men. Megan may come back for a brief encore, but that curtain closing finally signaled the end of the marriage. I suspect that Megan came to the final conclusion that she should leave Don when one of the secretaries at the beginning of the episode mentioned to Megan that she didn’t know Don was married. In other words, Don didn’t consider her family enough to mention it around the office.

There were other clues that Megan had left Don beyond the heavy-handed curtain metaphor. For instance, the fact that she decided to take all of her clothes with her back to Los Angeles, and the fact that she didn’t want Don coming back to Los Angeles to visit her (perhaps because she’s shacked up with someone else). Most telling of all, however, was the strange appearance of the newspaper in Don’s bedroom from the day after JFK was assassinated.

What happened in the JFK Assassination episode of Mad Men, “The Grown Ups”? Betty finally mustered the courage to leave Don.

Mad Men Power Rankings: Betty Francis

Isn’t there a little part of all of us that wants to side with Betty Francis, Supermom? Wasn’t it great how she volunteered to chaperone the trip to Pappy Cyrus’s Potato Farm, and then didn’t just stand by, smoking and trading jokes about Ms. Keyser’s cleavage, but actually gulped down a warm bucket of straight-from-the-udder cow-juice? There’s a version of Betty that never would have bothered, that would have stayed home, trading shots of straight-from-the-can Reddi-wip with her latex-entombed dark passenger. She’s at least making an effort now.

And sometimes that effort ends when your idiot kid trades your lunch for a bag of fucking gumdrops. There’s a reason she got rid of the first four Bobbys. No respect whatsoever for Mommy’s property. Who did the brat think that second sandwich was for? Why do kids ruin everything? Mommy needs a cigarette.

AMC is adapting Preacher

The network is teaming with This Is the End duo Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg and Breaking Bad's Sam Catlin to adapt Vertigo's Preacher, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. ’

Based on Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon’s 1990s comic series from DC Comics imprint Vertigo, Preacher revolves around Rev. Jesse Custer, a badass Texas preacher who, after losing his faith, learns that God has left heaven and forsaken his duties. Jesse becomes the only one who is able to track God down and hold him responsible for his abdication. Tulip O’Hare, Jesse’s beer-guzzling vampire ex-girlfriend, accompanies him on his quest for answers. But the story doesn’t end there: The Saint of Killers, an immortal killing machine and Western lone gunman type, is hot on their trail with his sights set on Jesse. (via)

This has potential to be amazing.

Bryan Cranston and Jane Kaczmarek reprised their Malcolm in the Middle roles to film an alternate ending to Breaking Bad and it’s the best.

Update: YouTube pulled the video but you can view it on The A.V. Club here

The third season of The Walking Dead is now available to watch on Netflix Instant. You have until October 13th to relive the series or live through for the first time before the fourth season begins.

Predicting What Happened After Breaking Bad Ended

• Jesse somehow managed to avoid any and all jail time. He’s taking care of Brock, maybe he’s also taking care of that little redheaded kid, and they play a lot of video games together. He draws web comics. He sometimes debates becoming a science teacher but doesn’t do anything about it. Once in a while, he jams with Badger and Pete in a shitty garage band. He go-karts with Brock every Saturday. He has a lot of nightmares, but he’s staying sober.

• Walt Jr./Flynn wrote a killer personal essay for college and was awarded enough in scholarships that he doesn’t need to take any of his father’s drug money. He tried to drink tequila at his first college party but vomits from the smell of it and decided to stick to beer instead. Girls love him. They think he’s tortured.

• Skyler enrolled in writing classes at the local community college. She’s working a novel, because everyone is always working on a novel, but it’s not about Walt. She would never write a novel about Walt. She quit smoking but keeps an unopened pack inside the top drawer on her nightstand. Just in case.

• Holly tried meth on her seventeenth birthday but it doesn’t stick. She’s forever stuck in a rebellious stage. 

• Marie started shoplifting again but the police still feel so awful about Hank that they just let her get away with it. She worries that she’s in love with her therapist. She drinks a lot of wine. She hasn’t touched any of Hank’s minerals.

• Saul manages a laser tag place in Nebraska. He’s rebuilding his collection of suits. He watches Low Winter Sun and flinches at loud noises.

• Oddly enough, Louis is the only person who visits Walter White’s grave. It’s creepy. 

• Badger and Pete live together in a nice house around the corner from Jesse. They’ve stopped doing hard drugs but they still smoke too much weed. Between them, they have twenty-six half-finished screenplays and one recorded podcast episode that they never got around to uploading. Sometimes, when Pete drinks too much, he thinks about kissing Badger.

• Huell is still in a hotel room, but this time it’s by choice. He’s been holed up with Wendy the hooker who is now Wendy the love of his life. Huell doesn’t judge Wendy’s occupation; Wendy brings Huell as many burgers as he wants. They have a karaoke machine. Huell is reasonably happy.

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Okay, sure, let’s talk about Breaking Bad. There are obviously a ton of spoilers in this post. 

Read More

Why Skyler White is the best character on Breaking Bad


Skyler is Walt’s only equal. She may not possess superior tactical acumen; her plan to vacate Walt’s dirty money by giving it to Ted backfires completely, and she calls herself a “coward” because she “doesn’t know” how to escape the life Walt’s forced on her. But she is the character most capable of making Walt vulnerable. Only she can completely undermine his rationalizations and expose to him his true reasons for choosing to break bad, which he evidently doesn’t understand himself.




In the episode “Fifty-One,” after Skyler’s false suicide attempt (she wades into the backyard pool in an effort to convince Hank and Marie to take the kids out of the house), Walt tells her, “You made a mistake, and things got out of control, but you did what you had to do to protect your family. And I’m sorry, that doesn’t make you a bad person. It makes you a human being.” Skyler erupts: “I don’t need to hear any of your bullshit rationales. I’m in it now. I’m compromised. But I will not have my children living in a house where dealing drugs and hurting people and killing people is shrugged off as ‘shit happens!’”




It’s easy to get pulled into the show’s narrative logic—Walt must overcome obstacle A to achieve goal B—to the point of blinding oneself to the evil of the particulars and their endpoint. We root for Walt because we want the show to continue. With the series’ final episodes at hand, our support dissolves—our desire to see Walt succeed in the short-term will turn into an eagerness to see him get his comeuppance. And Skyler will be there to remind us that he deserves it. (via)
Image via an article also worth reading.

Why Skyler White is the best character on Breaking Bad

Skyler is Walt’s only equal. She may not possess superior tactical acumen; her plan to vacate Walt’s dirty money by giving it to Ted backfires completely, and she calls herself a “coward” because she “doesn’t know” how to escape the life Walt’s forced on her. But she is the character most capable of making Walt vulnerable. Only she can completely undermine his rationalizations and expose to him his true reasons for choosing to break bad, which he evidently doesn’t understand himself.

In the episode “Fifty-One,” after Skyler’s false suicide attempt (she wades into the backyard pool in an effort to convince Hank and Marie to take the kids out of the house), Walt tells her, “You made a mistake, and things got out of control, but you did what you had to do to protect your family. And I’m sorry, that doesn’t make you a bad person. It makes you a human being.” Skyler erupts: “I don’t need to hear any of your bullshit rationales. I’m in it now. I’m compromised. But I will not have my children living in a house where dealing drugs and hurting people and killing people is shrugged off as ‘shit happens!’”

It’s easy to get pulled into the show’s narrative logic—Walt must overcome obstacle A to achieve goal B—to the point of blinding oneself to the evil of the particulars and their endpoint. We root for Walt because we want the show to continue. With the series’ final episodes at hand, our support dissolves—our desire to see Walt succeed in the short-term will turn into an eagerness to see him get his comeuppance. And Skyler will be there to remind us that he deserves it. (via)

Image via an article also worth reading.

Everyone always talks about the speeches/monologues Walter White makes in Breaking Bad and how they are so impactful. [spoilers below, bitch] We have the two most obvious speeches “I am the one who knocks" and "Say My Name”, but take a moment and rewatch those. (I’ll wait). Ok, now watch Jesse’s “You’re nothing to me, but customers” monologue. 

Aaron Paul won an Emmy for his performance in season four, but the episode that was submitted was ‘End Times’ - it was the episode where Jesse blames Walt for poisoning Brock and points the gun at him. Walt eventually convinces him it had to have been Gus and they team up again to kill Gus. Anyway, that was a great episode, but in my opinion this was Aaron Paul’s finest moment in the series (so far) and I will always imagine this was reason why he won his Emmy.

I binge watched seasons one through four of Breaking Bad on Netflix, with this past season being the first that I actually watched in real time on Sunday nights and hashtagged my heart out with everyone else on Twitter. Before I even started my at times crushing journey into high school science teacher Walter White’s turn into Heisenberg, I specifically remember TV Hangover’s own Pilot mentioning the uncontrollable and incredible emotions that she felt for Jesse Pinkman. When I finally began season one I was excited at the prospect of no longer be an outsider looking in. I tend to be a feeler. I cry a lot and mostly at things that don’t matter and I expected my irrational emotions to translate to my feelings towards Jesse, and then was so disappointed when they didn’t in seasons 1 and 2, and most of season 3. I wondered why people liked this kind of sad, pathetic, meth addict so much and failed to see his redeeming qualities. I couldn’t get to the point where I felt as though I understood him, or anyone on Breaking Bad for that matter. Perhaps it’s because I binge watched and didn’t allow myself enough time to ruminate on these people and form relationships with any of them. Or maybe it’s simply because Jesse Pinkman is the culmination of every dude I dated from ages 22 through 24 and I had formed a barrier that kept me from giving a shit because that’s a long hard road, y’all. It makes perfect sense then that my favorite episode of Breaking Bad is the one in which I finally felt those feelings for who I now refer to as my sweet, sweet Jesse. 

The season three finale was my point of no return. Full Measure so perfectly encapsulates the complexity of the members of Gustavo Fring’s handpicked inner circle to his drug empire that I couldn’t tell if I loved or hated these people for the entire hour. The episode opens with Walter and Skyler house hunting while Skyler is visibly pregnant with their first child. Skyler thinks that the house would be good for them and is just what they need at that point in their lives; Walter doesn’t think it’s good enough. It’s a simple scene, and on its own paints Walter as only an ambitious soon-to-be father with big dreams for himself and his family. But we know who Walter is now, and his stubbornness and insistence that they deserve better shows that this is who he has been all along – someone for whom good is never good enough. We know that he loses this battle, as it’s the house the family continues to live in and have yet to upgrade from despite Walter’s visions for their future. Practically speaking, Walter is exactly where he was almost 16 years ago and this makes him literally fucking crazy. Yet he has managed to hide this rage from his family, who more or less pity him as a humble teacher with a gambling problem struggling to keep his family afloat. The fact that he plays both so well is part of what makes Walter so terrifying. 

Gus also perfectly plays two people. He’s an evil genius whose ability to be both a charming and savvy hardworking businessman and a literal cut throat drug kingpin make him my favorite Breaking Bad character of all time. When he shows up at Gale’s apartment, nearly knocking the wind out of our sensitive meth maker whose very involvement with these people is proof that the unemployment struggle is real, Gus speaks to Gale about his own ability to run the lab. He is basically asking Gale when he can kill two of his employees as Gale awkwardly sits across from him like a school child afraid to disappoint his teacher. And we know this. We know that Gus is orchestrating Walter and Jesse’s murders and he is still so damn charming.

This same duality is also shown in both Mike and Jesse in this episode. The transition from Mike so sweetly telling his granddaughter that he always learns so much from her to using her balloons to cut the transformer outside the cartel’s place of business to set in motion the execution of a handful of men, literally leaving a pile of bodies in his path, is so precise and well, um, executed that it’s clear to me that you can be both a trained killer and just the cutest gentle Pop-Pop ever. With Jesse, we want to believe that he is mostly good, but his moral compass is skewed, as appears to be the case with most of our leading men. We’re in this mess because Jesse believes that using children in your drug business is wrong, but it’s not wrong to kill those who do. Despite his pro stance on murder, he does his best to convince Walter that killing Gale should be the last option on their list of ways to save themselves. Jesse doesn’t want to do it, but is ultimately forced to in the scene that breaks my goddamn heart. The moment in which Gale opens the door and then quietly begs for his life is heartbreaking. Gale and his perfectly arched eyebrows don’t deserve this and poor Jesse has crossed the invisible line that makes him every bit as bad as everyone else and he knows it. 

It shouldn’t be surprising that these men are complex, multi-faceted people, as most of us tend to be the result of a number of different parts, but when you look at a group of men that are all pretty terrible it can be hard to see them as anything more than that. Really. These people are terrible. They’re in a business that damages lives, ruins families, and leaves a trail of destruction everywhere it goes. They’re vicious, self-absorbed, murdering heathens with little to no care about anything that doesn’t directly affect them and their livelihood and each of them appears to be in it more out of greed than necessity. This makes it feel, for some reason, more wrong. And here I am playing the exact same game of moral superiority that each of these terrible humans uses to justify their actions and condemn the similar actions of others. Congratulations, Vince Gilligan. I think I’m ready to break bad. 

Guest Post by Ramou of Black Girls Talking.